Drupal Changed Our Lives

It is very rare that something so powerful can change a company overnight. Our long history as a web development company can be defined in single word: "Custom". Custom web designs, custom web programming, and custom web applications. These skills are things that we are most proud to promote. However, a "custom" Website doesn’t have to mean starting from scratch. Today, with the power of the entire contributed Drupal community, things are different. There have been so many advances in Drupal’s open source solutions that it is impossible for any web development company to ignore. The Drupal framework only enhanced our ability to develop custom Websites for our clients. Drupal changed our lives — It opened up new doors for all of us at Nu-Designs and our clients.

What is Drupal?

Drupal is an open source platform for creating a Website. Thousands of web developers world wide use the Drupal platform. Many of these developers have contributed additional functions to the platform. These new functions are contributed to the Drupal community in the form of a Module. A Drupal module is a widget of code that works with the Drupal framework. The module basically plugs into the Website, adds new functionality and can be configured in a variety of ways. Today there is a library of over 8,000 Drupal modules available for any project. As a Drupal developer, Nu-Designs can leverage this module library for the benefit of our customers. We can utilize existing modules or we can make "custom" modules to meet our clients needs. The point is: why do something from scratch when it has already been done before? To find out more information about the Drupal framework, visit the Drupal.org Website.

If you are a Drupal developer be sure to check out our Drupal community site Made With Drupal.


News and Updates from Drupal.org

October 7, 2015

We now present the first release candidate for Drupal 8.0.0! Drupal 8 includes a tremendous number of new features and improvements for both users and developers.

We revamped Drupal's user interface; added WYSIWYG and in-place editing; significantly improved mobile support; added and improved key contributed modules including Views, Date, and Entity Reference; introduced a new object-oriented backend leveraging Symfony components; revamped configuration management; improved multilingual support; and added hundreds of other improvements. Drupal 8.0.0-rc1 is the collective work of over 3,200 core contributors. Read more about what's new in Drupal 8.0.x.

The first release candidate provides a great opportunity to begin developing with Drupal 8, especially for:

  • New sites.
  • Sites that rely mainly on the expanded functionality provided by Drupal 8 core alone.
  • Projects that will take months of development time.
  • Sites for which Drupal 8's benefits outweigh the effort needed to port (or work around) contributed modules that do not yet have Drupal 8 versions.
Using Drupal 8 # Launching new sites #

Drupal 8 itself is very functional straight out of the box -- many of the top Drupal 7 modules are now included in core, and several features have been made more flexible to avoid the need to install many other modules. Evaluate your needs, and you may easily find that everything you need for a project is already included in Drupal 8 core. Check out our slides about Drupal 8 to learn about the changes.

Updating existing sites #

The new version also includes a revamped Migrate module to update existing Drupal 6 and 7 sites to Drupal 8 directly. The migration feature is currently marked "experimental," meaning it is not yet fully supported and we are still working to improve it. For this reason, the Drupal 8 release candidate does not yet provide a user interface for migrations. Use the Migrate Plus and Migrate Upgrade modules to test migrations now, or read more about Migrate in core.

Contributed modules and themes #

There are a number of modules already ported to Drupal 8 as well as themes already being developed. We set up the contrib tracker project to make it easier to track the status of the ports of contributed modules.

DrupalCon Barcelona Drupal 8 sprint photo by Pedro Lozano (under the CC BY 2.0 license) Porting modules and themes to Drupal 8 #

If you have not done so already, now is the time to ensure that your modules and themes will work with the new version. While there are many changes in Drupal 8, we wanted to make it as easy as possible to get started porting modules. We suggest you use Drupal Module Upgrader to run a first pass of code upgrades. Some things will be automatically upgraded while others will get a @todo comment or will be left untouched.

To help you learn and apply the new APIs, the api.drupal.org site has overviews and short examples of all major Drupal 8 APIs. The Drupal.org handbooks have in-depth guides with more background information on each API as well. We also have a complete list of all API changes to Drupal 8, spanning the 4.5 years of Drupal 8's development.

Instead of using our own home-brewed templating system from Drupal 7 and earlier, Drupal 8 uses the Twig templating engine. Many of the concepts from previous versions of Drupal still apply with Twig. We are working on a guide for you to help update your themes. Also check out the Drupal 8 theming documentation for more information.

Be sure to file any core bugs that you may find while updating your module or theme.

Translating Drupal 8 #

The interface strings are officially frozen now. Only error corrections, removals or additions of whole strings, and fixes required for critical issues may be made to the interface text from this point forward. This is the best time to translate Drupal 8, so your translations will be available when the final version is released. The installer now comes with automated translation downloads, so whatever you translate now will be useful for all Drupal 8 installs. Localize.drupal.org has a summary page about core translation status in all the supported languages with a step-by-step guide in the sidebar to help you contribute.

Documentation, book, and video authors #

The user interfaces, interactions, and "look and feel" of Drupal 8.0.0 are now frozen and will only be changed if required for critical bug fixes. If you previously put your documentation, instruction video, or book project on hold, now is the time to pick it up again. Now is also the time to update documentation on Drupal.org and to get documentation fixes into Drupal 8, so the explanations are correct. Thanks for your contributions!

Be aware that Drupal 8 will employ semantic versioning, with new "minor" releases (backwards-compatible with API additions and new features) approximately every six months. So strings, user interfaces, and other visual aspects of Drupal will be improved throughout the entire Drupal 8 process, which may require subsequent updates to these materials.

Contributing to Drupal 8 core #

During the release candidate phase, only critical fixes and documentation improvements will be committed to Drupal 8 core (plus certain non-disruptive "rc target" changes at core committer discretion). Other issues that have been reviewed and tested by the community may remain uncommitted until after 8.0.0 to ensure that critical bugs can be fixed quickly without risking regressions. Read more about the allowed changes during the RC phase.

When will Drupal 8.0.0 be released? #

We will schedule an official release date for 8.0.0 when we are confident that the rate and nature of incoming critical bugs has slowed enough to ensure a stable release. Until then, release candidates of Drupal 8 will be released twice a month concurrently with the Drupal 6 and 7 release windows.

Known issues #

We are confident that our code is stable enough for wider testing by site owners, developers, and end users. There are however still known issues with Drupal 8.0.x, including major bugs. Help resolve these issues by testing Drupal 8 and searching for existing bug reports and adding more information to help resolve those bugs. If your suspected bug hasn't been reported yet, submit a bug report.

There is a known issue with response cache headers sometimes exceeding hosting configuration limits that may cause some pages to not be viewable on some hosting providers. If you run into this, see that issue and its related issues for details.

Handling security issues #

Starting now, any security issues discovered for Drupal 8 should be kept confidential and reported using the Report a security vulnerability link on the Drupal project page in order to protect existing sites. Through December 31, 2015, the Drupal 8 security bounty is also still active, so you can get paid for finding security issues and reporting them in our private tracker! See the security team page for more information on Drupal security.

Talk about the release candidate! #

We suggest the #drupal8rc hashtag for Twitter, Facebook, etc. posts. To mention and find conversations about work already made with Drupal 8, use #madewithd8. We can't wait to see what you make with Drupal 8!

Front page news: Drupal NewsDrupal version: Drupal 8.x

September 22, 2015

We are excited to announce some big changes to the Drupal.org Marketplace. In Dries’ Amsterdam Keynote, he made a compelling case for showing the contributions of organizations that are helping build Drupal. By highlighting organizations that give their employees time to give back, we make it possible for more people to give time to making the project better.

In March, we took steps to begin collecting this information by allowing individuals that were contributing in the issue queues to attribute their contributions to organization that they are employed by or customers that funded the work. When a maintainer of a project (module, theme, distribution or Drupal Core) closes an issue as fixed, they have an opportunity to pass on credit to the individuals who helped contribute to fixing the issue—and not just code contributions, but any kind of feedback, review, designs, etc.

We called this system issue credits and it has been a huge success. We now show the last 90 days of issue credits awarded to an individual or organization on their profile.

Today, after months of collecting this data, we are taking how we highlight contributing organizations to a new level.

With this launch, we are removing the distinction of "featured service providers" versus "all service providers". By using data about these organizations contributions, we can provide a single list of all organizations ordered by their contributions.

For now, we are using issue credits as the primary sort. The secondary sort highlights organizations that are giving back by supporting Drupal.org through the supporting partner program or organization membership. Soon, we plan to incorporate case studies submitted, DrupalCon sponsorships, and camp sponsorships to help make a more complete picture of how organizations are contributing to our community.

Give it a look and give us your feedback.

Front page news: Drupal News

September 15, 2015

DrupalCI is the next generation testing infrastructure for Drupal. After years of development, DrupalCI has been rolled out for testing Drupal 8 Core and Contrib projects - and will soon be taking over testing Drupal 7 Core and Contrib as well and for Drupal 6 for the duration of its long term support window.

But we need your help!

At this time, DrupalCI is running in parallel with the existing PIFT/PIFR testing architecture. Before we retire the old testing infrastructure we want to ensure that there are no feature regressions in the new DrupalCI system, and that core and contrib developers have had time to learn the new testing architecture and try it out thoroughly.

If you are a maintainer of a contrib module with testing enabled, we will enable DrupalCI testing for your project. At this time, DrupalCI supports testing in D8 Core and Contrib, but D7 and D6 testing will be enabled soon. If you see that DrupalCI testing has been enabled for your project, please provide your feedback in the issue linked below.

To learn more about how to use DrupalCI for automated testing of your project on Drupal.org, please consult this documentation page.

How can you provide feedback?

We are collecting feedback on the new testing architecture in this issue: #2534132 - Disable Legacy Testbots and use drupalCI as our testing infrastructure. Please focus your feedback on:

  • Feature regressions from current testbots
  • Unexpected test failures
  • User interface issues
  • Test result parsing and display

Though DrupalCI is a more flexible and extensible testing architecture, we are not collecting additional feature requests at this time.

If you are a module maintainer, and you are a satisfied that the new DrupalCI tests are meeting your testing needs, you can return to the Automated Testing tab for your project and choose to disable PIFT/PIFR testing, by deleting the specific releases you no longer need tested in the old system:

Learn how to add automated testing to your project…

If you would like to add automated testing to your projects on Drupal.org you can learn more about writing tests with this tutorial.

Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 6.xDrupal 7.xDrupal 8.x