Drupal Changed Our Lives

It is very rare that something so powerful can change a company overnight. Our long history as a web development company can be defined in single word: "Custom". Custom web designs, custom web programming, and custom web applications. These skills are things that we are most proud to promote. However, a "custom" Website doesn’t have to mean starting from scratch. Today, with the power of the entire contributed Drupal community, things are different. There have been so many advances in Drupal’s open source solutions that it is impossible for any web development company to ignore. The Drupal framework only enhanced our ability to develop custom Websites for our clients. Drupal changed our lives — It opened up new doors for all of us at Nu-Designs and our clients.

What is Drupal?

Drupal is an open source platform for creating a Website. Thousands of web developers world wide use the Drupal platform. Many of these developers have contributed additional functions to the platform. These new functions are contributed to the Drupal community in the form of a Module. A Drupal module is a widget of code that works with the Drupal framework. The module basically plugs into the Website, adds new functionality and can be configured in a variety of ways. Today there is a library of over 8,000 Drupal modules available for any project. As a Drupal developer, Nu-Designs can leverage this module library for the benefit of our customers. We can utilize existing modules or we can make "custom" modules to meet our clients needs. The point is: why do something from scratch when it has already been done before? To find out more information about the Drupal framework, visit the Drupal.org Website.

If you are a Drupal developer be sure to check out our Drupal community site Made With Drupal.

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News and Updates from Drupal.org

May 6, 2015

Drupal 7.37, a maintenance release with numerous bug fixes (no security fixes), is now available for download. See the Drupal 7.37 release notes for a full listing.

Download Drupal 7.37

Upgrading your existing Drupal 7 sites is recommended. There are no major, non-backwards-compatible features in this release. For more information about the Drupal 7.x release series, consult the Drupal 7.0 release announcement.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 7 includes the built-in Update Manager module, which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

There are no security fixes in this release of Drupal core.

Bug reports

Drupal 7.x is being maintained, so given enough bug fixes (not just bug reports), more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Changelog

Drupal 7.37 contains bug fixes and small API/feature improvements only. The full list of changes between the 7.36 and 7.37 releases can be found by reading the 7.37 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Update notes

See the 7.37 release notes for details on important changes in this release.

Known issues

See the 7.37 release notes for a list of known issues affecting this release.

Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 7.x

April 17, 2015

On April 15th, a change to a Drupal.org website permission inadvertently allowed a small segment of users to view a report listing the email addresses of recently logged in users. No passwords were involved. The problem was mitigated within 13 hours of being introduced and within 3 hours of being reported. The problem was completely resolved within 24 hours of introduction. The number of affected email addresses is relatively small – fewer than 500. Those users are being contacted directly if their email was affected. Users with maintainer access or the community role and above were not affected by this incident.

The users with permission to see this report were limited to community members that have shown frequent contribution to Drupal.org. The possible exposure time was also limited to between April 15, 2015 20:53 UTC to April 16, 2015 9:00 UTC. There were approximately 44 IP addresses that accessed the information during that time. These users are mostly administrators of Drupal.org and the community members who first reported the incident.

Even though the exposure of email addresses was limited as described above, we recommend all users to be cautious of any email that asks you for personal information.

We want to thank the community members who moved quickly to alert the Drupal Security and Drupal.org infrastructure teams about the problem.

Drupal version: Drupal 7.x

April 15, 2015

The first initiative on the Drupal.org 2015 roadmap is ‘Better account creation and login’. One of the listed goals for that initiative is “Build a user engagement path which will guide users from fresh empty accounts to active contributors, identifying and preventing spammers from moving further.” This is something Drupal Association team has been focusing on in the last few weeks.

The first change we rolled out a few days ago was a ‘new’ indicator on comments from users whose Drupal.org accounts are fewer than 90 days old. The indicator is displayed on their profile page as well. We hope this will help make conversations in the issue queues and forum comments more welcoming, as people will be able to easily see that someone is new, and probably doesn’t know yet a lot about the way community works.

Today we are taking another step towards making Drupal.org more welcoming environment for new users. But first, a bit of background.

New users and spam

It is not a surprise for anyone that a big number of user accounts registering on the site are spam accounts. To fight that and prevent spam content from appearing on Drupal.org, we have a number of different tools in place. Of course, we don’t want these tools to affect all active, honest users of the site, and make their daily experience more difficult. To separate users we are sure about from those we aren’t sure about yet, we have a special ‘confirmed’ user role.

All new users start without such a role. Their content submissions are checked by Honeypot and Mollom, their profiles are not visible to anonymous visitors of the site, and the types of content they may create are limited. Once a user receives a ‘confirmed’ role, his or her submissions will not be checked by spam fighting tools anymore; their profile page will be visible to everyone, and they will be able to create more different types of content on the site.

This system works pretty well, and our main goal is to ensure that valid new users get the ‘confirmed’ role as quickly as possible, to improve their experience and enable them to fully participate on the site.

The best way to identify someone as not a spammer is have another human look at the content they post and confirm they are not spammers. Previously, we had a very limited number of people who could do that-- about 50. Because of that, it usually took quite some time for new user to get the role. This was especially noticeable during sprints.

Today we’d like to open a process of granting a ‘confirmed’ role to the thousands of active users on the site.

‘Community’ user role

Today, we are introducing a new ‘Community’ role on the site. It will be granted automatically to users who have been around for some time and reached a certain level of participation on Drupal.org. Users who have this role will be able to ‘confirm’ new users on the site. They will see a small button on comments and user profile of any user who has not yet been confirmed. If you are one of the users with ‘Community’ role, look out for this new Confirm button, and when you see one next to a user - take another look at what the person posted. If their content looks valid, just click ‘confirm’. By doing so, you will empower new users to fully participate on Drupal.org and improve their daily experience on the site.

We expect to have at least 10,000 active users with the ‘Community’ role. With so many people to grant the ‘confirmed’ role, new users should be confirmed faster than ever before.

If you aren’t sure if you have the ‘community’ role or not, don’t worry. We will send an email notification to every user whose account receives the new role. The email will have all the information about the role and how to use it.

Thanks for helping us make Drupal.org a better place!

Front page news: Planet Drupal